rockingyourrole

For women who Rock their Role in work and life

Archive for the tag “primary earner”

What’s your legacy as a woman breadwinner?

You are leaving a lasting legacy

You are leaving a lasting legacy

Here are a couple of responses I had from women on being the breadwinner recently:

I see myself as a role model for my niece, that you can’t leave it all up to a man. You have to be able to support yourself and if need be your family.

I know not to say I am the main bread winner, this seems to be a thing of shame to my male partners family and they would never acknowledge or talk about it. People still talk as if the money is his and I spend it – which is strange.

What sort of legacy are you leaving as a female breadwinner? Is it positive where you exude confidence, are happy and helping to establish a new normal? Or is it negative where you’re stressed, burdened and angry with your lot?

Coping with the highs and lows of financial independence, balancing traditional roles with new ones and remembering to take care of yourself isn’t easy. But you should bear in mind that however you choose to manage these challenges, your actions will leave a legacy for those that follow in your footsteps.

If you haven’t reflected on the legacy you leave or how you’re a role model and have influence over others, this is a good time to start. Think about it, if you were teaching someone to drive you would show them how to do it well and model your best self. It’s the same with showing the world how to be a female breadwinner. You need to display best practice whenever you can.

How you choose to be in the role of breadwinner has a significant effect on those around you. In my book Rocking Your Role: the ‘how to’ guide to success for female breadwinners I spoke to women main earners that were leaving a positive legacy for those that follow by making their corner of the world work.

Here are a few points I picked up:

Enjoy it – have pride in what you are doing even if it happened by accident or is a temporary situation. Ditch the guilt around being a female breadwinner and try to enjoy your role. This will give others the confidence to do so too.

Set your own terms- the role of main earner is traditionally male and you may work in a male dominated area, but that doesn’t mean you have to act like one. Let go of other’s assumptions to formulate the unique vision of you. You can be a main earner on your own terms; you just need to brave enough to set them.

Avoid superwoman syndrome- when you try to do it all and present an image that nothing has to give when juggling family and work you send out the wrong message. It’s an impossible charade that hurts you and the people that look up to you.

Stay healthy- if you want future female main earners to have a good sense of well-being, to feel physically and mentally healthy then you should place these things high on the agenda for yourself.

Embrace femininity- it can be hard to be able to display feminine characteristics in a traditional male role or even at work with many male colleagues but don’t shun them. It can send the wrong message to our daughters, sisters and nieces as well as the males in our lives.

As a female breadwinner you are one of the new breed of women that the world is watching. Whether you like it or not you now wear the badge of trendsetter or pioneer – so why not use your new position of power to encourage a positive legacy to help future female main earners? Give it a try and see the difference it makes to those around you.

I am Jenny Garrett, Executive Coach, founder of Reflexion Associates, a leadership and coaching consultancy and author or Rocking Your Role – the how to guide to success for female breadwinners. Find out more about me, my programmes, speaking engagements and training at rockingyourrole.comand sign up for my newsletter

A review of Rocking Your Role, all the way from Chicago, enjoy

Rocking Your Role, the 'how to' guide to success for female breadwinners

Rocking Your Role, the ‘how to’ guide to success for female breadwinners

I have been making some wonderful connections via LinkedIn

One of them has provided her feedback on the first chapter of my book ‘Rocking Your Role, all the way from Chicago.

She concludes ‘Thus, it is evermore important for women to invest and empower themselves in order to combat the backlash. more comfortable you are in your role, the easier it will be to take on the world, no matter the context.

Read the rest here “Rocking Your Role” by Jenny Garrett. and feel free to comment

I am Jenny Garrett, Executive Coach, founder of Reflexion Associates, a leadership and coaching consultancy and author or Rocking Your Role – the how to guide to success for female breadwinners. Find out more about me, my programmes, speaking engagements and training at rockingyourrole.com and sign up for my newsletter

Women’s Ways

Womens Ways_Jenny Garrett_Rocking Your Role

 As a female breadwinner have you ever caught yourself suppressing your feminine traits in order to succeed? I know I have, in the past at work I’ve worn trouser suits, changed my language and not valued my unique perspective.  And at home in moments I’m not proud of ‘I’ve talked about being capable of being man and woman of the house’

One thing that influenced and helped me value my feminine perspective was reading a book called Women’s Ways of Knowing I read this book when I was studying for my Masters in Management Learning and Leadership at Lancaster University and it has stayed with me.  The book is based on the research from interviews with 135 women and describes five different perspectives from which women view reality and draw conclusions about truth, knowledge, and authority. How they often feel silenced by what could be described as masculine, logical and singular arguments.

What’s interesting for me is that because the masculine is often rewarded, women and men can start to devalue their feminine qualities.  The reality is that men are encouraged to be as masculine as possible and women are taught to downplay feminine characteristics to get ahead in the workplace. I however believe that your femininity has a unique value. Precious attributes like emotional intelligence, a draw towards collaboration and social responsibility can set you apart for the better.

It makes sense that a woman taking on the traditionally masculine role breadwinner means that you combine the masculine and the feminine. But if you find the masculine taking over in a way that is not good for you, you may need to rekindle your femininity.

In my book Rocking Your Role, I provide a framework in order to help you determine the qualities you work hard to present to the world and the ways to turn these off when you need to. Here are some tips to get started:

Value feminine traits- don’t push feminine traits aside because they are not valued in the workplace or because of your role as main earner. Bring one feminine quality back into your day for 30 days to remind yourself how useful it can be. Embrace being motherly, vulnerable, emotional, quiet, soft, loving, kind or whichever quality it is that you have been suppressing and notice the difference it makes in your life.

Nurture your femininity - once you have learned to value your feminine side don’t forget to look after it whatever it is that makes you feel like a woman. This could be new lingerie, a shopping date, meditation, or a meal with friends. If it feels too girly, do it!

Set your own terms - the role of main earner is traditionally male and you may work in a male dominated environment, but that doesn’t mean you have to act like one. You can be a main earner on your own terms; educate others to value what you bring while also valuing what they have to offer. Future generations will be grateful that you did.

Remember being feminine isn’t a curse; it’s a blessing. Get back in touch with it and maintain your femininity, if not to show the world that it is ok, but to remind yourself that it is.

 

I am Jenny Garrett, Executive Coach, founder of Reflexion Associates, a leadership and coaching consultancy and author or Rocking Your Role – the how to guide to success for female breadwinners. See my Certificated Rocking Your Role: Women Breadwinners and Entrepreneurs programme, it might be just the development that you’re looking for.

Why you must take a holiday

Why you should take holidays

RockingYourRole_Jenny Garrett

I’ve just come back to work from 3 weeks off over the Christmas period, which was fantastic.  I had time with my family, watched films from start to finish, which I rarely do (Horrible Bosses had me laughing out loud, great film if you haven’t seen it) and took long baths and read for pleasure.

I confess, I checked my social media, responded to the odd email but I didn’t attempt to or want to get my teeth into anything workwise.  This took discipline because I run my own business, and it’s really hard to switch off.  Even if you are employed, you know what it’s like.  For me there are always exciting opportunities, collaborations coming my way, conversations that I want to contribute to and new ideas that I want to put into action.

The result?  My first week back has been really productive, I purposefully didn’t book any external meetings, so have been burrowed away in my office.  I called it creative and planning time in my diary.

You know those things that you keep meaning to do but don’t and often end up doing over your holidays, well this week I’ve done those.

Things like writing new assignments for the ILM Coaching and Mentoring Course that I deliver, following up with clients to see their progress, deciding what I will delegate, archiving, actually booking in meetings with those connections that I know I would benefit from chatting over coffee with and putting together a clear strategy for 2013.

What’s even better, is that I have done them with a clear head and relaxed body, I know I have been more productive and the quality of my output has been better than it would have done otherwise.  You see when I get too busy, too tired, I lose my groundedness, my centre, my connection to what’s important.  This is why I take regular time out to make sure that every connection is a good one, that my intentions are connected to what’s important to me: supporting women juggling work and home, particularly those who are the main earner. Ultimately, I want to be the best: wife, mother, daughter, granddaughter, employer, coach, colleague, speaker, author, friend, I can be without losing myself in the process.

So what am I going to do to keep working from this good place:

  1. Meditate at least 3 times a week in order to keep my mind clear and my focus sharp – the Chopra center does a 21 day mediation – only 5 minutes per day which is really effective
  2. Book in my holidays now – if I wait for a gap in the diary it wont come.  I am going to book three holiday slots in my diary when I will not be working.  These don’t have to be exotic holidays, you can be at home if you’re disciplined enough.
  3. Keep delegating – I know that family, friends, colleagues all want to help if I give them the space and guidance to do so.

So what about you? Reach for that diary right now and book those dates out, and feel the weight lift off your shoulders and your productivity improve. Even if you can’t control the amount of holiday you take, make sure that you take the maximum entitled to you.

I am Jenny Garrett, Executive Coach, founder of Reflexion Associates, a leadership and coaching consultancy and author or Rocking Your Role – the how to guide to success for female breadwinners. Find out more about me, my programmes, speaking engagements and training at rockingyourrole.com and sign up for my newsletter

Leadership Success programme for Women – 4th March, 2013

Want to live in state of contentment, happiness and abundance in 2013?

Want to:

  • feel truly present at work and in your family roles?
  • Have ‘me’ time?
  • Feel that you have choices?
  • That you can share the responsibility and it’s not all down to you?
  • Be guilt- free?

This one day programme is designed to help you Rock Your Roles in life

BOOK NOW early bird ends 14th Jan, 2013

——————

Speakers:

Andrew Priestley – international speaker and award winning coach will share the ten money managing skills that WILL make a profound difference to your relationship with money

Joanna Pieters – founder of Time Wizard will share how to choose, use and manage outsourcing to help you succeed at home and at work

Amber Khan – wellness mentor and author will set you on the path to living a guilt-free life

Jenny Garrett – executive coach, speaker and author will practical steps to move you from struggling and juggling to rocking your roles in life

Find out more about us here

—————–

Learn:

  • How to have the ‘money’ conversation that you’ve been avoiding
  • Improve your communication
  • How your leadership preference is impacting your communication
  • How to avoid the pitfalls that most Women Breadwinners fall into
  • Strategies to succeed and feel in control

——————

Who is it for:

Women who are the primary earner in their home

Women entrepreneurs

Women executives

***LImited to 8 particpants***

Programme Overview:

The aim of the programme is to help women like you, lead themselves to success:

Using the 12-step process designed by Jenny Garrett from her work coaching hundreds of women and outlined in the research in her book Rocking Your Role, you will:

  • Focus on your Personal and Professional Leadership skills
  • Increase your critical leadership skill of Self-Awareness
  • Understand the Emotions that may be holding you back
  • Embrace your Femininity as a strength
  • Celebrate Success
  • Action Plan

Benefits:

  • Increased Confidence in your ability to cope and succeed
  • Freedom from the shackles of guilt, resentment and shame
  • Improved sense of psychological, physical and spiritual Well-Being
  • Sense of Direction and Purpose
  • Community and Belonging through the Support of the group
  • An ILM (Institute of Leadership & Management) certificate

What have you got to lose?

No quibble money back guarantee if you dont find the day valuable

What participants have said:

****

A fabulous, supportive, empowering course for female breadwinners and entrepreneurs to share ideas

Hannah Foxley, Women’s Wealth Expert
****

Empowering and an eye opener

Aina Khan, Family Law Consultant

*****

Enlightening, delicate, but rich

Cherryl Martin, CMO with FTSE 100 Marketing, Sales and Business Performance Expertise

*****

Reflective of my needs

Caroline Peryagh, Director, Global Client Strategy

Book Now ***LImited to 8 participants*** early bird ends 14th January, 2013

See RockingyourRole.com for more about Jenny, her speaking engagements and events.

Speakers announced for Women Breadwinners Leadership Success Programme

Andrew Priestley ISMM-2Andrew Priestley is an award winning business coach, author and international professional speaker.

Qualified in Industrial and Organisational Psychology, Andrew helps people to both make and save more money and become more profitable.

This session will introduce you to ten money managing skills that WILL make a profound difference to your relationship with money. If your goal is to have more money you will enjoy this session. If your goal is to be debt-free this is a must.

Joanna Pieters
Joanna Pieters founded lifestyle organisation service Time Wizard after 15 years running large teams in high-pressure media businesses. Having seen friends and colleagues overwhelmed by the stress of juggling work, family, and health, she asked, ‘who can help?’ When the answer wasn’t obvious, she started Time Wizard to take on their to-do lists and daily tasks, allowing pressurised families to be healthier, happier and less stressed.

Joanna helps her clients be more successful by finding practical ways to identify and outsource appropriate areas of their lives. She helps clients see delegating at home as a sign of strength, rather than something to feel guilty about, allowing them to focus on the things that are most important to them and their families. An expert in delegation, organisation and productivity, Joanna is in regular demand from the UK media to talk on subjects as diverse as decluttering and time management.
This session will introduce you to how to choose, use and manage outsourcing to help you succeed at home and at work.
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Amber Khan is a wellness mentor, speaker, an entrepreneur &  a soon to be published author of Guilt-free Mum.
She has experience of working in the corporate environment, the pressure & responsibilities which come with it, in addition to the household responsibilities of a mother.
A health scare 2 years ago impelled her to change her lifestyle. To let go of the super mum & mummy-guilt syndromes for a healthier & sustainable future for herself & her family. She has since helped several mothers along their journey of guilt trips.
Amber is passionate about liberating mothers from ineffective practices & to put them on the path to living a guilt-free lifestyle.
and me – Jenny Garrett  423744_10150696561171514_1808655218_n

Sought after executive coach, mentor, founder of Reflexion Associates leadership consultancy and author of Rocking your Role.

I have featured extensively in the media, on programmes such as: Radio 4′s Woman’s Hour & Newstalk radio as well as writing articles and contributing to many national publications, such as Sun Employment and Glamour Magazine. I am also a blogger for the BOSS American woman’s online network. Over 10 years of experience as an executive coach and trainer has enabled me to create this practical and transformational programme.

Only 6 places left – BOOK NOW **** Early bird price only £75

Move from struggling and juggling to Rocking Your Role in life

Sound familiar:

  • Torn between work and family roles?
  • Zero ‘me’ time?
  • Feeling that you have limited choices?
  • It’s all down to you?
  • Riddled with guilt?

This one day programme is designed to move you from struggling and juggling to Rocking Your Role in life

Learn:

  • How to have the ‘money’ conversation that you’ve been avoiding
  • Improve your communication
  • How your leadership preference is impacting your communication
  • How to avoid the pitfalls that most Women Breadwinners fall into
  • Strategies to succeed and feel in control

Who is it for:

Women who are the primary earner in their home

Women entrepreneurs

Women executives

Only 6 places left - BOOK NOW **** Early bird price only £75

 

Programme Overview:

The aim of the programme is to help women like you, lead themselves to success:

Using the 12-step process designed by Jenny Garrett from her work coaching hundreds of women and outlined in the research in her book Rocking Your Role, you will:

  • Focus on your Personal and Professional Leadership skills
  • Increase your critical leadership skill of Self-Awareness
  • Understand the Emotions that may be holding you back
  • Embrace your Femininity as a strength
  • Celebrate Success
  • Action Plan

Benefits:

  • Increased Confidence in your ability to cope and succeed
  •  Freedom from the shackles of guilt, resentment and shame
  •  Improved sense of psychological, physical and spiritual Well-Being
  • Sense of Direction and Purpose
  • Community and Belonging through the Support of the group
  • An ILM (Institute of Leadership & Management) certificate

Only 6 places left - BOOK NOW **** Early bird price only £75

What participants have said:

****

A fabulous, supportive, empowering course for female breadwinners and entrepreneurs to share ideas

Hannah Foxley, Women’s Wealth Expert
****            

Empowering and an eye opener

Aina Khan, Family Law Consultant

*****         

Enlightening, delicate,  but rich

Cherryl Martin, CMO with FTSE 100 Marketing, Sales and Business Performance Expertise

*****

Reflective of my needs

Caroline Peryagh, Director, Global Client Strategy

Only 6 places left - BOOK NOW **** Early bird price only £75

Money, Money, Money in a rich woman’s world

Many British couples are burying their heads in the sand over their financial situations. One in seven1 (14 per cent) couples over the age of 40 – or around 4.22 million people – admit they have never discussed their finances, according to new research from Prudential.
Fears about having awkward conversations drives this behaviour, with 15 per cent of those surveyed admitting they feel uncomfortable talking to their partners about financial planning.
A concern that these conversations will boil over into arguments is another reason that couples avoid talking about their finances – money is the third most likely subject to cause arguments among couples, with nearly one in four (23 per cent) claiming that they fight over finances, ahead of work (10 per cent), and politics and religion (5 per cent). Only household chores (27 per cent) and disputes about family (30 per cent) are more likely to cause disagreements.
Even for the majority of couples who do discuss their retirement plans, long-term issues are likely to be side-lined, as short-term everyday expenses take priority. Daily living costs and household bills are regularly discussed by the majority of couples (60 per cent and 52 per cent respectively), and one in three couples (34 per cent) speak about the costs of home improvements, large purchases and luxuries.
However, discussions about long-term planning are far less prevalent, with only 16 per cent of couples claiming to regularly talk about retirement income and pension planning. Only three per cent of couples claim they have had conversations about inheritance planning and tax.
Vince Smith-Hughes, retirement expert at Prudential said: “Money can be a tough topic to discuss at the best of times. Many couples prefer to steer clear of conversations about finances, and especially discussions about longer-term issues like retirement which might feel light-years away.

When was the last time you spoke to your partner about money? Unfortunately, sex and money are the subjects least spoken about in relationships. Left un-discussed, the issue of money can lead to resentment, shame and guilt all seething under the surface.

As a female breadwinner, in an effort not to emasculate or disempower you may have chosen to avoid money conversations with your partner, leaving you with the full weight of responsibility. On the other hand you might have thought it unnecessary to talk and behave as you like because it’s your cash, assuming that your partners silence means that it is OK.

Whatever the dynamic, conversations about money need to happen so you and your family can live a much richer life. In my book Rocking Your Role: The how to guide to success for female breadwinners I provide a framework for that conversation. Here are a few tips from female breadwinners I have met.

Identify attitudes- defining attitudes towards money is a good way to get the conversation started. Are you the same or different from your partner? If you don’t share the same values talking will help draw out some of the tensions. If you are too similar it might be better to discuss what you can both do differently to make the most out of money.

Make it practical – put all emotions aside and make money about practicality rather than power. You are in a great position to use your voice to break down taboos and decide what money means to your family.

Work as a unit - make choices about how you use and manage money together- a family unit can’t have people moving in different directions.

Join up accounts? – a joint account is one option that doesn’t work for everyone, it can make household and family spending a joint decision rather than a point of contention. Money can move freely and it doesn’t have to be divided up so obviously. You can always put money aside in a separate account as well.

Money conversations can help you make the right decisions about who manages it, what purchases and investments are made and how to build a future for your family. What happens as a result might surprise you! One woman I spoke to felt that women needed to earn at least equal to their partners to have an equal say in the relationship!

Talking about money is the only way to destroy the power it holds over us. It can be uncomfortable, embarrassing and stressful for everyone involved but having it out in the open is better than letting resentments fester on both sides.

Be the brave and courageous lioness I know that you are and start the conversation. Let me know how you get on!

I am Jenny Garrett, Executive Coach, founder of Reflexion Associates, a leadership and coaching consultancy and author or Rocking Your Role – I help professional working women move from struggling and juggling to rocking their many roles in life. Find out more about me, my programmes, speaking engagements and training at rockingyourrole.com

Black Friday Offer

For Today Only  - Book your One Hour Skype Coaching Session for only £25

Use Your One Hour to focus on one of these areas outlined in my book Rocking Your Role

  1. Your Values – what’s at the heart and essence of what you do and your decisions
  2. Your Choices – what choices are you making, why you are making them and who owns those choices
  3. Celebrating – what is good about your current situation that can be built upon
  4. Ditching the guilt –  ways to stop guilt holding your back and sapping your energy
  5. Assumptions – noticing how others assumptions may impact your behaviour and strategies to combat this
  6. Stopping – crafting your don’t do list, what do you need to give up in order to take yourself forward
  7. Communication – what channels are you using to communication, with how and how, what can be built on, what has not been said
  8. Interdependence – ways to collaborate and recognise what and who you need to make things work
  9. Honesty – being honest with yourself about what you want
  10. Fulfilment – being clear about the fun aspects of your life and giving them importance
  11. Wellbeing – focusing on improving aspects of your physical, psychological and spiritual well being
  12. Sharing/ Planning – bringing it all together into a plan for success

I will also throw in access to a 15 minute video recording sharing the 4 keys to success for working women.

Find out more about me here – my time is usually charged out at £200 – £400 per hour to those working in corporate organisations.

I will not be repeating this offer anytime soon.

To book go to http://blackfridayskypecoachingoffer-eorg.eventbrite.com

Have a great day

Female Breadwinner Rocking her Role – Servane Mouazan

Servane Mouazan is the founding director of Ogunte, a company focused on supporting women-led social ventures. She is a female breadwinner that takes satisfaction from the work she does rather than the money she earns. We talk to her about forgetting to get paid, why she knows everything about cows and the importance of doing what you love.

Hi Servane, first off could you tell me a bit about your background.

I come from Brittany in France and grew up in an average lower middle class family. My mum was a teacher and my dad was a social worker but spent most of his time singing and writing books.

How has your family life shaped you?

My parents were divorced when I was very young. So I grew up in a single parent family but my dad was always present, he visited once a fortnight. My mum had the tough task of being breadwinner, bringing back money to the house and taking care of two young children. This is something I learnt a lot from- the difference between what you need and what you want, what’s superfluous and what is a real treat. It’s harsh and it leaves some scares sometimes but actually with time you reflect on this and say to yourself, she did pretty well, she did a good job.

What is your earliest memory of work?

I left home when I was 19 and I went travelling because I didn’t want to stay at home. So as you do I became an au pair in the Netherlands. It was crazy. I ended up in a single parent family there as well! I lived with a single mum speaking French much better than me but I learnt Dutch through singing, university and through post. That was my first experience of being a breadwinner in the 90s, earning money by being a singer and au pair – it made me very excited.

What did you do after your degree?

After my studies I returned to Brittany but with little experience I found it hard to find a job. Fortunately, I could speak a range of languages so found work as an interpreter. That led me into a few funny situations!

I ended up working in the farming industry taking Dutch people on trips to visit dairy farms. I knew everything about cows! Imagining putting that on a CV- it definitely shows you have a broad interest in life. Language has been an essential asset to my life and enabled me to earn quite a substantial amount of money, anywhere and at any time.

How did being a female breadwinner and a social entrepreneur come about for you?

I moved to the Netherlands again and became involved in volunteering for community development initiatives it is here that I started my journey in social enterprise. Through this work I found opportunities to help on projects in Brazil. The people I worked with at the time were telling me I was good at what I did, so why don’t I charge? So my first big story was: I had forgotten to charge for what I did! Not so good if you need to be a breadwinner.

How does it feel to be a female breadwinner?

The satisfaction is more about delivering the work and achieving something. Seeing the connections between people and bringing people together was a revelation for me. It is a rewarding experience because of the understanding that there is a point in doing all this.

Did you make any mistakes on the way?

Well when you start you of course realise you know nothing about business and that is a job in itself and you have to learn everything. I remember I organised some gigs and shows to put the light on some development initiatives, the first band I booked cost me much more than I had been paid to show them. Disaster! I learned very quickly.

Who are your role models or the important figures in your life?

Apart from my dad, in the 90s my match in energy was a singer called Skin from Skunk Anansie. I liked her because of the energy she showed on stage, her political involvement and her directed lyrics. It was a point when my interests and my passions were merging; politics, activism and performing arts.

Do you have any mentors?

On the activist side when I was in Brazil there was one artist that was particularly important to me, Marcello Uka. Sadly 11 years ago he got shot in a street robbery and he ended up in a wheelchair. Despite all the pain and the suffering he continued to deliver and compose songs. He is very strongly involved in all sorts of campaigning- when I first met him I thought we’ve got the same ideas but he has them in a good order; I’ve got them in a random order. So he became a sort of mentor to me and still is. He is going for mayor in the city of Rio in Brazil- he just never stops.

What’s been most challenging for you as a female breadwinner and social entrepreneur?

For me I can’t dissociate the money making from my political involvement or my activism or my values. Which can be bad because at the same time I have priorities; I have rent to pay, I have a son to feed so I will always need to find a cause to fight and be paid for.

That said I still do a lot of things for free, too much according to my mentor. If I say yes to too many things I am creating my own poverty, meaning I’m not sticking to my own values so I have learned it is ok to say no.

Confidence is a volatile currency and we are the first ones to sabotage ourselves so we need to always check every day about our values; are we keeping up with them? Money is part of it- what it brings, what it enables you to do and how it helps you survive but you need to be able to enjoy what you do as well.

What’s good about being a female breadwinner?

Well it is probably what is good about being a male breadwinner. I don’t put any difference on being a female breadwinner. This probably comes from my dad, when he married again he always used to say, my wife is doing work at home I just happen to be on a payroll outside the house but the money I bring is paying us all. I like that.

Female or male it depends on the stereotypes we follow. It’s about where you place value and being paid is just a technical question. My dad values what my mum and step mum do at home. But sometimes it feels like the whole of society doesn’t value what is being done at home, so there is a feeling that women will get something extra by working outside this context.

Do you think the currency of work is a problem?

Well yes. Another person I admire is Edgar Cahn founder of Time Banking. He says the whole point of one man hour as a currency is a very interesting thing because the economy doesn’t take into account all the contributions of the volunteers and the carers, and that there is a discrepancy for how we are accounting for these workers. There are some things missing from the state’s accounts. Unfortunately a lot of women are part of that category; they are in situations where they provide some sort of service that is never accounted for in pound value. We need to pay attention to that but things are changing slowly.

What do you think are some of the responsibilities of a female breadwinner?

It is important to think about how we spend our money. There is the breadwinner, the bread eater and the crumbles. Good can come when money is distributed in a new way. If someone can earn money and make it circulate so it creates more wealth and more value along the way- then that is a different category of breadwinner.

What legacy do you think you leave as a female breadwinner?

Depending on how you make your money is the nature of your legacy. I have chosen to be a social entrepreneur and I have chosen to help other social entrepreneurs and activists. That’s my thing, that’s my gig. I am not happy if I have to do something else!

What about the legacy for your son?

For my son I don’t think you can teach a child anything but manners and values. If he can say ‘thank you’, ‘please’ and be solution focused leaving his surroundings and environment in a better state than he found it, then I have done my job.

What are the top 3 lessons you’ve learnt as a result of being a female breadwinner?

Learning to charge for my work is number one! Other than that be sure you work with your assets,  try not to depend on anyone or any state – sometimes you have to and it is ok but it is not a long term solution at all- and finally create opportunities for others because it will eventually create opportunities for you.

Online Seminars/Webinars for female breadwinners, executives and entrepreneurs

Female Breadwinners

Jenny Garrett, author of Rocking Your Role has crafted a series of 45 minute on line sessions, ideal for the busy working woman to get bite size input into their development.
Numbers are limited. BOOK NOW

Session Name: Ditch the Guilt – Top Tips for Working Parents
In this interactive session led Jenny Garrett, author of Rocking Your Role. You will discuss ways to ditch the guilt that often comes with being a working parent and learn to maximise the time you have with your family
To Book: http://www.skilio.com/session/info/2481
Date: Mon 26 November 2012  8:00pm
Cost £15

Session Name: Getting Noticed for all the Right Reasons – for women
In this interactive session, Jenny Garrett, author of Rocking Your Role, focuses on verbal communication, body language and image to stand out positively in the work place
To Book: http://www.skilio.com/session/info/2452
Date: Mon 10 Dec 8:00pm 2012
Cost: £15

Session Name: Make it Happen! – Craft your Vision for 2013
In this practical session, Jenny Garrett, author of Rocking Your Role, will guide you through the process of creating your personal and professional vision for 2013
To Book http://www.skilio.com/session/info/2453
Date: Tuesday 15th Jan 2013 8:00pm
Cost: £15

Session Name: Getting a Competitive Edge – Top Tips for Women Entrepreneurs
In this interactive session, Jenny Garrett, author of Rocking Your Role, will share her holistic top tips for being competitive in crowded market
To Book: http://www.skilio.com/session/info/2561
Date: Tuesday 22nd January 2013 8:00pm
Cost: £15

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